Discussions With Dao

Podcasts and Audio Archive of Jon Dao

JNOC: Blackout Trainer Origins

blackout

 

It’s been over 3 years since we had this conversation, and with over 2,000 listens, it’s pretty clear Chase’s story has made an impact on a lot of people. What’s interesting to me is how badly I edited the audio back then, so here’s a more succinct and remastered version.

 

Chase: My whole life I’d been called skinny. Been told it’s genetics. You’ll never be able to put on muscle or get past the skinny phase. It’s just your destiny. 

Jon: Did you really believe that?

Chase: I mean as a kid, you kind of do. You take it to heart, like, this is what I’m stuck with. You let it sit in your mind because the adult’s telling you this. And okay, they’re adults– they know better.

Jon: [laughs]

Chase: [laughs] Yeah… it really set up a timeline of motivation, different things I would draw on my whole life.

My eye doctor at the time, he’s a real skinny guy, we were just talking. He was like, “Yeah, me and my son, we work out, but we’re just destined to be skinny.” And I was just like, I don’t think that’s the case. If I keep my mind focused and on the right path I think I can kind of do anything I set my mind to.

Jon: Where did that come from?

Chase: I always attribute my love for training to where it started, and that’s with my grandfather. He used to be a trainer back in the day. He was always into fitness and making yourself the “best you”. 

His drives were these big biking ventures across the United States. Just the drive he had inside really pushed me from a young age. 

And as I graduated high school,  I think the big part that catches a lot kids off guard is the move from an athletic life. In high school you play sports. You’re doing all kinds of things. [Then] you move to college, and all of a sudden you become pretty sedentary. You got no one pushing you to work out through teams or anything.

I was very determined not to let [that happen].

 

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One comment on “JNOC: Blackout Trainer Origins

  1. Pingback: The Little Rock Architect: Origins - Architects of Aesthetics

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